Click HERE to register

Seminar Cost: $40 (+tax)

This is an all day educational seminar to be held at the UBC campus, in the “Nest Building” at the Presentation Theatre.  Sorry, no dogs allowed

Morning lectures covering – leash reactivity, separation anxiety, resource guarding, nutrition and vaccinations

Afternoon Round Table rotating small groups for discussions on the above topics

 

Presentations by:

Dog Trainers Jen and Dee, founders of @CalmingK9dogtraining.com

Veterinarians Dr. Suann Hosie, and Dr. Fraser Davidson @Acadiavetclinic.ca

 

Click HERE to register

 

#AdoptDontShopEducate

Feature Dog of the Week:

Meet Mickey… here is his story :
Mickey has been with one owner since he was 3 months old and has to be adopted out to a new family due to no fault of his own except for the fact that his mom relocated here from Kelowna and she could only find a place that accepted one dog.
-high energy and would do best with a backyard, Hikes and the dog park
-he’s a barker but, one look at a spray bottle and he knows to stop-also barks at animals on the TV-does bark in a condo when he hears noise outside the door
-no signs of aggression-has some fear around men but is able to warm up to them after awhile
-independent much like a cat but, when he is ready and wants cuddles he is a cuddle monster
-gets cranky when he is tired and wants to go to bed
-does not like to be picked up suddenly
-good with well behaved cats-good with dogs
-has had no issues around children but, judging from the not liking to be picked up suddenly I am guessing small children might not be the best
-good alone for up to 8 hours
-crate trained
-can be left to roam around the house with a puppy pad
-can be left with food in his bowl and will not overeat
-raised on Acana brand food
-good teeth that have been brushed regularly
#meetMickey.

Dolly’s Journey

Dolly Update September 27, 2018:

It is with shock and devastation that we have to let our community know that our sweet Dolly crossed over the Rainbow Bridge very suddenly this morning. We are a gasp. She contracted pneumonia very quickly but in the care of the specialist at CanWest Critical care she was diagnosed with a very rare, deadly disease called “ Myesthenia Gravis”. There was no turning back so she left this world suffering very little and sitting in heaven with our #Syd and all the others who will guide her into the clouds with warmth and grace. Thank you Jane, Dolly’s mom for 6 months, CanWest Critical Care hospital , Dr Fraser Davidson and Dolly’s California team.

 

Dolly was rescued from a shelter in California after her owners gave her up to be euthanized because she was “too fat and not active anymore”. Not only was she abused by overfeeding, but was physically abused as well, and yet this special girl was so lovely and sweet. At 10 years old and 30 pounds overweight, Dolly had quite the journey ahead of her, but she was up for the challenge and lost 10 whole pounds! TDIAO is proud to have played a small part in Dolly’s journey and she will always be part of our family.

To help Dolly’s Mom with Dolly’s final vet bills please click here to donate. $1, $2…anything helps. Thank you for everyone’s support!

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ADOPTED & COUNTING

UPCOMING EVENTS

We are a not for profit, 100% volunteer based dog rescue society that runs entirely on the love of dogs.

We do what we do for the same reason you’re here: to make a difference. We’re saving as many dogs as possible one day at a time.

OUR MISSION

To rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome as many Adoptable Dogs at risk of being euthanized, surrendered, abused, or neglected as possible.

OUR PLEDGE

Our dogs come first. They are the centre of why we do what we do. As a registered not-for-profit rescue society, the safety, wellbeing, and health of our adoptable dogs comes before anything and everything else. This means we do rigorous background checks, home checks, and follow-ups with every adopted dogs and foster dogs.

Over 800

DOGS RESCUED

Over 100

VOLUNTEERS

Over 9,000

DOGS KILLED PER DAY IN US SHELTERS

MEET SOME OF THE DOGS WE'VE ADOPTED IN THE PAST